Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Happy to be walking again


Meadowsweet.  The Queen of the Meadow.   The drink Mead gets its name from this plant as it was used to flavour it in the past.  Chaucer mentions it - "Medewurt", but it was used much earlier than Chaucer's Medieval times, as Meadowsweet pollen has been found in Beaker burial potsHere's a Dartmoor reference to it being used in a burial context too, only as a floral tribute, rather than an alcoholic drink to take into the next world.



Nipplewort.


Bramble flowers are SO pretty.


Meadow Vetchling.


Square Stemmed St John's Wort.  If you feel the stem, it really DOES feel square.  To check it wasn't Perforate St John's Wort (the two are similar), I picked a leaf off and held it up to the light.  No perforations on it.


Tufted Vetch.  Perhaps my favourite wild flower - it always brings a smile to my face.  In this photo the colour isn't very true as it is more purple than this.



Pink brambles this time.  What a beautiful colour they are, with just the merest smudge of lilac in their colouring.

I have to say I am delighted with the camera I got for Christmas (the Lumix).  It takes really good close ups and good scenery shots too.

16 comments:

  1. I think that Meadowsweet might have been one of the ones which was sewn into the mattresses?
    Arilx

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    1. It was a strewing herb I think - for floors. From memory, it was the Bedstraws which were sewn into mattresses (hence the name I guess!) But hey, why not Meadowsweet too.

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  2. You are the second person to mention meadowsweet - as Pat/Weaver had it on her blog. I had to look it up to see what it looked like and we don't have any here at all - I suppose we are too dry.
    My camera also has problems with purple/pink/lilac never quite right also Lumix but I'm no good at close ups, never seem to be able to hold it still enough and I've lost the instruction booklet/CD!

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  3. The name of our farmhouse (translated from the Welsh) means "White Meadow", so I think there was a lot of Meadowsweet hereabouts. It is a common plant in these parts.

    I think it is the camera's reaction to light which changes the blue/purple perception. Anyway, I know it's purple! If you look up your Lumix camera on line, you will find how to use it. I can't use my CD any more as this new laptop doesn't have a CD player (they are deemed unnecessary these days).

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  4. The meadowsweet is flowering here too, except I call it Ladies Bedstraw. It is the scent of midsummer - just delicious. Good to hear you're walking and lovely to see your photos. It is so grey and damp tonight it is hard to believe only last.week we were basking in 30 degrees surrounded by butterflies.

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    1. You're right on it being the scent of summer Sarah. The pollen tickles my nose though, so I daren't sniff it! I would like the sun back, only not quite so hot . . .

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  5. Excellent camera Jennie, lovely to see the wildflowers of summer.

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    1. This camera should see me out Thelma - by that time I should know all its functions!

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  7. It is a super camera - results are lovely :) Wonderful to see all the wildflowers near you and I always look forward to seeing meadowsweet.

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  8. Hi RR. Lots more wild flower photos taken today, but not sure if my readers are up to another overload of them! Will put the best up.

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  9. Ah meadow sweet is what is carpetting Long Eaton cricket ground nature reserve at the moment! Thanks for the ID. As for nipplewort!

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    1. Glad I satisfied your curiosity on that one Simon. As for Nipplewort - don't know how it came to be named!!

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  10. Beautiful flowers BB. Your new camera certainly does the business!

    I think the shape of the buds gives a clue about the name Nipplewort :-)

    We saw meadows full of Meadowsweet down by the River Avon , on our way to Salisbury this week.

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  11. Hi DW. I am enjoying getting to know my new camera. Hadn't thought about the buds giving Nipplewort its name!

    Saw masses of Meadowsweet and rosy spires of Rosebay Willowherb growing together today - of course, my camera was at home!

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