Monday, 22 February 2021

Spring is here and a local walk to an ancient church


 
This is what I like to see - lots of routes to explore!  There were a couple 3-way splits on today's walk.  We couldn't resist the sunshine and birdsong and feel of spring (especially as there is rain due the rest of the week).  So we set off to visit the little church we had seen in the distance recently.  It was a good choice.


We walked past a pond with Bullrushes, but no water birds availing themselves of the spot.  It was pretty muddy on the track, and Iwas glad I had my walking boots on.


The river Irfon again - our footpath led along the bank.


It was indeed a day stolen from spring and reminded me of a Pre-Raphaelite painting, as the colours were so sharp and atmospheric.


This Oak Moss grows on all the trees hereabouts and shows the purity of the air (free from nitrogen pollution).


A view of where we walked recently  (up through the woodland on the left).


The little church, of some antiquity, but sadly restored in Victorian times, as was often the case.  It is hard to tell how much of the original building survived.   An ancient spot, and well chosen - although it is approached when it is open these days, across two fields.


A local lass who sadly died aged only 13.  The stained glass image of her makes her live on.




Taken through the plain glass window at the back, the trees are reflected and the window looks like it is floating.  Tam took a much better photo like this and I hope to borrow and add it later.

There were masses of Snowdrops blooming in a corner of the field the burial ground and church are set in.


A reproduction of the Early Christian Monument associated with this parish.  We saw the real thing when we were in Brecon Museum a while back.  It ended up in the adjoining parish, built into a house there - but had previously been built into a high-status Elizabethan house (which didn't survive the centuries). It dates from the late 9th/early 10th Centuries.


One of the earlier headstones propped against a bank.


Looking back at the church as we walked across the field. . .


Above and below:  First Daffodil (Yay!) and first Dandelion.  The bees will be happy. A lovely walk, over 4 miles and we had a chat with another (horsey) neighbour on the way back.  We plan to meet up for a good chinwag when it is safe to do so again.


28 comments:

  1. A lovely post and photos. Good to see the daffodil and dandelion in flower. It looks a super walk and I love the church. The stained glass photo of the girl who died young is very poignant. It is great there is so much to explore and places to walk near your new home.

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    1. I enjoyed sharing them RR. 13 is SO young to die. Lots of great walks to explore and many on our doorstep.

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    1. Indeed. I hope you will be feeling brighter soon too.

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  3. Oooooohhhh... green grass & flowers. How beautiful! If you visit my blog you will see *my* view. *haha* We have to wait awhile yet for green! :) ~Andrea xoxo

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    1. Just going across Andrea. I am guessing you still have snow!

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  4. You've soon found lovely places to walk.
    It rained here for much of the day and didn't feel very warm at all

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    1. The number of walks around Builth is amazing. Some will be a right challenge but others easier and I look forward to going further afield. Sorry you didn't have our spring weather.

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  5. What a joy to see the snowdrops and daffodil. The Church was a delight, I loved the stained glass window a real feast for the eyes.

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    1. It was wonderful to see spring arriving. I look forward to seeing inside the church when it is occasionally opened in the summer.

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  6. Ooh I do love old churches and cemeteries.

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    1. Me too - always something interesting. Kempley remains my favourite : https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/st-marys-church-kempley/

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  7. It's lovely the way you are exploring the area so soon after moving in. I must say it looks delightful. What a pity these days that they have to keep our churches locked isn't it?

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    1. Well, four walls soon feel like a prison during Lockdown and we are at least allowed to walk freely. This little church is only open (for a monthly service I believe) during the summer months in normal times.

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  8. I've had some lovely walking days too the last week or so

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    1. That's good to hear Simon. Do you go far afield?

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  9. You have landed in a lovely place. The church is sweet, even though it has been changed. Sad portrait of the young girl who died she must have been dearly loved.

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    1. Haven't we? The main road through always makes Powys look rather dour, especially between here and Newtown, but get off the main drag and it is a different place entirely. The young girl was from a local family - I wonder what took her off this mortal coil?

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  10. What the Victorians did to a lot of churches makes me quite angry. Such arrogance. I made a series of Celtic crosses for Scotland once. The originals are also now in a museum.

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    1. Indeed - they thought they were doing good to rip out and modernise. Even Thomas Hardy in his architect days, was party to this too. Oooh - didn't know you were a sculptor. Can Iask about the Celtic crosses? My dissertation topic was on the equine iconography of the Early Christian Monuments of Scotland .. .

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    2. I cannot remember from where they originated - West is all I can recall. They were brought to me - 2 granite and one red sandstone - and I had to take care until the job was finished. The people had to ask me which were the originals, which was gratifying.

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    3. That is praise indeed Tom! My studies were mainly in the East, although some peculiarly-shaped "horses" turned up on some of the Govan stones.

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  11. How happy you sound! Nothing like an almost spring day to add joy to your walk. Watching nature begin to blossom again is balm to the soul.

    Must say, the stained glass memorial to the young girl was beautifully rendered.

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    1. Happy indeed Mary. We struggled for the last 10 years, wanting to move, and viewing a couple of places each year "just in case" and there were some interested people, but no offers. Nature is indeed a balm to the soul.

      I have never seen such a beautiful piece of stained glass - they obviously had the best in the business to bring their daughter to life in glass.

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  12. What a beautiful stained glass window. The young girl must have been so loved. You do live in a really beautiful place to walk.

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    1. I am sure they were heartbroken at her death, especially as so young (13). It is stunning around here - we never looked closely at a map of the area until we knew we were buying this house and were then amazed at the footpaths and bridleways close to our house!

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  13. Really enjoy your blog and photos. Jennifer from Aus.

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    1. Hi Jennifer (from another one!) - glad you enjoy my blog and photos. I try my best.

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